World News

Winter weather cancels flights, leads to death in Texas


Winter weather on Tuesday brought ice to Texas and nearby states, causing more than 980 flights to be canceled and nearly 800 more to be delayed.

There have been multiple car collisions in Austin, Texas that have killed at least one person, according to the Austin Fire Department.

More than 500 flights to/from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and nearly 125 flights to/from Dallas Love Field were canceled or delayed Tuesday, according to FlightAware tracking service.

Dallas-based Southwest Airlines has canceled more than 300 flights and delayed almost 100 more, according to FlightAware.

The storm began on Monday as part of “several rounds” of winter precipitation expected Wednesday in Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee, National Weather Service meteorologist Mark Chenard said.

“Typically, light to moderate freezing rain results in fairly significant ice formation,” Shenar said.

“We’re expecting a quarter-inch or higher ice accumulation as far south as Austin, Texas, to Dallas, Little Rock, Arkansas, towards Memphis, Tennessee, and even approaching Nashville, Tennessee,” Chenard said.

The flight disruptions followed Southwest’s December crash, which began with a winter storm but continued after most other airlines recovered. Southwest has canceled about 16,700 flights in the last 10 days of the year, and the US Department of Transportation is investigating.

The weather service issued a winter storm warning for most of Texas and parts of southeast Oklahoma, as well as an ice storm warning for mid Arkansas to western Tennessee.

Winter weather advisories are in place for most of the rest of Arkansas and Tennessee, as well as most of Kentucky, West Virginia, and southern parts of Indiana and Ohio.

Schools and colleges in Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas planned to close or move to virtual learning on Tuesday.



Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button